Knowledge is Power

By October 14, 2013Uncategorized

KnowledgeimageIf you’re suffering from chronic pain, you’re not alone! There are millions of Americans that are learning how to manage their pain. Seeing a pain management specialist and attending peer support groups are ways that you can take an active role in making the proper decisions for your health. Becoming an advocate for your own health is a major factor that plays into the proper diagnosis and development of the correct treatment plan. You can further your knowledge of chronic pain by reading literature recommended by the American Chronic Pain Association.

The American Chronic Pain Association’s (ACPA) mission is “To facilitate peer support and education for individuals with chronic pain and their families so that these individuals may live more fully in spite of their pain. To raise awareness among the health care community, policy makers, and the public at large about issues of living with chronic pain.”

Here are just a few books that the ACPA recommends:

  1. Coping With Illness by Helen Garvy Chronic illness creates new problems, accentuates already existing problems and upsets the balance in our lives and relationships, this author tells us. Her book gives both practical advice for day-to-day coping and suggestions for tackling what lies ahead.
  2. Meeting the Challenge: Living With Chronic Illness by Audrey Kron In this question and answer book, the author’s own chronic illness gives her the perspective for making suggestions about balancing a normal life style with chronic illness.
  3. We Are Not Alone: Living With Chronic Illness by Sefra Kobrin Pitzels The book begins with a description of the author’s life when chronic illness, Lupus, overwhelmed her and concludes when her illness is manageable. Especially noteworthy are the chapters that discuss the impact of chronic illness on the family, talking to children about illness, keeping friendships, and dealing with health care providers.
  4. Mastering Pain: A Twelve Step Program for Coping With Chronic Pain This is not a 12-step “recovery” program but a book about twelve specific behaviors and attitudes a person needs to cultivate in order to manage chronic pain and live well despite the pain.

These books will give you the knowledge to empower you to make the right choices about your chronic pain condition.

To learn more and see the complete list of books recommended, please visit the American Chronic Pain Association at: www.theacpa.org.

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